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Monthly Archives: July 2015

Filet Mignon with Balsamic and Rosemary Glaze

Trying to come up with a dinner without too much meat and found this one on Pinterest (a great site BTW). Simple to put together with some baked potatoes and  steamed broccoli. The glaze was very flavourful.

Filet Mignon with Balsamic Glaze
(makes 4 servings)
Ingredients
• 2 tablespoons plus 1 tablespoon (set aside) butter
• 4 filet Mignon steaks
• 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
• salt to taste
• 2 shallots
• 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
• 1/4 cup dry red wine
• 2 tablespoons rosemary, finely chopped
Directions
1. Pat the steaks dry with a paper towel. Pepper and salt both sides of each steak to taste. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat. Melt 2 tablespoons butter, then add the fillets to the pan and allow to sear for 4 minutes, then flip and let sear for another 4. Four minutes resulted in a medium well meat. Next time I would try three and three or less! I like medium rare.
2. Transfer the filets to a plate, and keeping the burner on medium high. Melt the last tablespoon butter then add the shallots and saute for 3 minutes. Add the wine and vinegar to deglaze, using a spatula to scrape off the browned bits. Add the rosemary. Bring the mixture to a boil, and season with salt to taste. Turn the heat down to medium and simmer until the liquid is reduced by half.
3. Return the fillets to the pan and cook to desired doneness, flipping halfway through. Plate the steaks with steamed vegetables and potatoes, then spoon the reduction over top of the steaks.
4. Enjoy!
Recipe adapted from All Recipes

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Thai Jicama Salad

Pachyrhizus erosus, commonly known as jicama or Mexican yam, Mexican turnip, or Mexican water chestnut is the name of a native Mexican vine, although the name most commonly refers to the plant’s edible tuberous root. Jícama is a species in the genus Pachyrhizus in the bean family (Fabaceae). Plants in this genus are commonly referred to as yam bean, although the term “yam bean” can be another name for jícama. The other major species of yam beans are also indigenous within the Americas.

imagesChopped, cubed, sliced into fine sticks, raw or cooked, jicama is versatile and great in stir-fries, salads, slaw, soup, and with other veggies and fruits like oranges, apples, carrots, and onions, as well as meats and seafood. A favorite Mexican recipe is chilled jicama slices sprinkled with chili powder, salt, and lime juice.

Our friend Lynda is a great Thai cook, having lived there for many years. This salad is awesome. FYI…yes jicama is available in Canada and the United States.

Thai Jicama Salad
Ingredients
2 green onions finely sliced
1 jicama sliced match sticks (2 to 3 cups)
1 cucumber chunk or match sticks
1 red pepper sliced
1/2 cup cilantro
1/4 cup Thai basil (or any basil)

Salad Dressing
1/4 cup lime juice
2 tbsp. fish sauce
2 tbsp. soya sauce
2 cloves of garlic minced
2 tsp sugar
1 minced red chili or 1/2 tsp crushed chili flakes

Combine all dressing ingredients and stir to dissolve sugar.
Place all salad ingredients in a bowl. Pour dressing over & toss well.

Great for a potluck…

Chow Chow Relish

Chow-chow (also spelled chow chow or chow chow) is a North American pickled relish made from a combination of vegetables. Mainly green tomato, cabbage, chayote, red tomatoes, onions, carrots, beans, asparagus, cauliflower and peas are used. These ingredients are pickled in a canning jar. After preserving, chow-chow is served cold, most often as a condiment or relish. (Wikipedia)

Tis the season for lots of fresh veggies. While visiting our friend in Waterloo, we sampled her friend’s relish. It was dynamite! She graciously consented to share the recipe, so here it is. Let me know if you make it and liked it! Now that we are home again, I will be making a batch. She tells me it can make 10 to 12 jars…maybe I will sell it…LOL. Thanks again Lorna!!

Seriously, I will cut the recipe in half…

Chow Chow Relish

6 qt basket tomatoes (8-10 large tomatoes)
3 large diced onions
2 cups diced celery
2 green peppers diced
1 red pepper diced
1 or 2 hot peppers
1 ½ cups vinegar
4 cups sugar – I use 2 brown and 2 white
2 tbsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp ground cloves
1/3 cup pickling spice tied in cheesecloth

1. Blanch tomatoes in boiling water; peel and chop.
2. Dice celery, onion and peppers – size as desired. (I do quick pulses in food processor for convenience; makes the chili sauce more minced than diced)
3. Tie pickling spice in cheesecloth and add to pot.
4. Stir in vinegar, sugar and spices.
5. Bring to slow boil. Simmer about 3 hours, or until desired consistency is reached.
6. Put into sterilized jars and seal. Keep in a cool place.
7. ENJOY!